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Journeyman

it came out of the wordwork

I wish I knew
coffee
kinzel
I wish I knew what food causes what kind of dreams. Maybe someone should make a study...

This morning, for example, I woke with a very vivid dream still in memory, a dream in which Don Wollheim was talking to me about an article I'd written, suggesting that while it wasn't a bad article I'd lost a little steam after the third page of it...

I'm not one of those people with perfect memories over years and years, and what that has to do with this... is that I'd met Wollheim 30 years ago at a worldcon, and spoke to him several times at the convention, even ending up having breakfast with him when the table Sue and I were eating on was requisitioned by dining room staff in the midst of the meal... (the dining situation at DisCon II was very strange!). And darned if I can recall what we talked about except in very vague generalities. I don't *think* he'd really admitted to reading anything I'd written, though we did talk for some time about fanzines since I was running the fanzine display for UMBC.

So, why a dream about him, now? Was it the merlot? The low-fat cheddar cheese? The veggie crackers? The anadama bread? Was it more about the story I'm writing than about the food? Was it because I've been thinking a lot about the people I met in those early days, since so many of them have been seriously ill?

So, some writing on Jerel today, and a fascinating chance to talk with Wally Shugg, my former UMBC English professor who has a book out.... you can see the cover here at the Maryland Historical Society: http://www.mdhs.org/Shopping/PUBLICATIONS/shugg/coverpage.html ...

" The first history of the oldest continuously operating institution of its kind in the Western World�the Maryland State Penitentiary in Baltimore. Opened in 1811, the penitentiary was first regarded as a profound improvement in the reform and treatment of criminals, as men and women formerly sentenced to labor on Baltimore's notorious "wheelbarrow gangs" were given a chance to served their sentences behind sheltering walls."

Sigh, looks like another book I'll need to add to my pile!